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Office of Graduate Diversity and Inclusion 2nd Annual Spring Speaker Series By Dr. Sweeney Windchief “Culturally Attuned Mentoring Paradigms: Relationships in Community Context”

February 22, 2017 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm

For additional information, contact Christopher Perez – cperez6@umd.edu

Office of Graduate Diversity and Inclusion 2nd Annual Spring Speaker Series

By Dr. Sweeney Windchief

“Culturally Attuned Mentoring Paradigms: Relationships in Community Context”

Nanticoke Room 1238, Stamp Student Union

 

Dr. Sweeney Windchief (Fort Peck Assiniboine Tribe) is Assistant Professor of Adult and Higher Education at Montana State University.  Dr. Windchief earned an Ed.D. in educational leadership and policy with an emphasis on higher education administration, an M.A. in counselor education from the University of Montana and a B.S. from the University of Central Oklahoma. He is part of the PNW-COSMOS team for the Pacific Northwest AGEP, which seeks to increase the representation of Native American graduate students in STEM. His research interests include critical race theory, indigenous epistemologies, indigenous peoples and higher education, indigenous intellectualism, American Indian student success and higher education, and mentorship.  Dr. Windchief teaches Critical Race Theory, Indigenous Methodologies in Research, Law, and Policy in Higher Education, and Institutional Research.  His outreach and community engagement include Montana’s American Indian and Minority Achievement Council (AIMA), MSU’s American Indian Student Center Executive Committee.  Dr. Windchief’s articles include: 21st Century Indigenous Identity Location: Remembrance, Reclamation, and RegenerationSilences in stewardship: Some American Indian college students examplesRed Pedagogy: Reflections From the Field; and The History of the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation; 1600-2012. Prior to moving to Montana State University, Dr. Windchief held various positions in higher education institutions, including serving as the coordinator of graduate fellowships and special projects at the American Indian Graduate Center in Albuquerque, N.M.; directing a W. K. Kellogg-funded Native men’s wellness initiative, the Bureau of Indian Education Fellowship and Loan for Service; facilitating the All Native American High School Academic Team; and presenting at the Western Association of Graduate Schools. Previously, he advised and recruited historically underrepresented students at both the University of Montana and Idaho State University, and he served as assistant dean for diversity in the Graduate School at The University of Utah.

 

Sponsored by The Graduate School, Office of Graduate Diversity and Inclusion, and the Pepsi Enhancement Fund with additional support by PROMISE AGEP

Contact Information

The Graduate School, University of Maryland

2123 Lee Building
7809 Regents Drive
College Park, MD 20742
301-405-3644
gradschool@umd.edu